Post #7. On paper dolls

This week I put the finishing stitches to the first quilt in my paper doll series. It was nice to get one small piece finished. It was also nice to see how hand quilting adds a new dimension to the work. (Here I go again on the virtues of hand quilting!) Originally I machine stitched the horizon line behind the row of power dolls, found it too harsh, unpicked it and restitched it by hand. I am pleased with the result. Here is the photographic evidence.

 

I am planning to make 12 quilts in the paper doll series. The project is not as ambitious as it sounds because the individual quilts are small (25 x 25 cm). It does mean a lot of binding – 1.2 metres to be exact. Wish I had not done that quick calculation! Sewing on the binding is the only boring part of making a quilt. To find the right binding for the paper dolls took quite a while. It had to be a black and white fabric and I first tried thinner stripes, then black and white dots, then black and white prints until I came across this broad stripe amongst the home decorating fabrics. So, I can make all that trial and error research and shopping pay off by binding 12 pieces with the chosen fabric.

Why paper dolls? They were a comforting part of my childhood. Both playing with a manufactured cardboard paper doll and her whole wardrobe of different garments, or cutting my own dolls out of paper in the style used for this quilt. Apparently the first paper doll was called Little Fanny and she was manufactured in 1810. So they have been around for 200 years.

3 thoughts on “Post #7. On paper dolls

  1. The fact that we, like paper dolls, are all equal (some more than others) and only when the maker pencils in our lips, changes our skin color and hair that we become individual.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh I really like the running stitch on these! I remember loving paper dolls as a little girl. I can’t wait to introduce my granddaughter to them one day.

    Like

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