On Hand Piecing

A few weeks ago I attended a morning workshop with Yolande Bowman of Pied Piper Quilt Shop (my LQS) and learnt a clever way to hand piece hexagon shapes. She showed us how to join the patches without using paper templates, as in the English Paper Piecing (EPP) method. I have fallen in love with Yolande’s method and finished the piece started at her Elongated Hexis class. It is designed to be a cushion cover and measures about 50 cm square.

The class was great fun with lots of quipping and swopping of fabrics. I started off using browns and muted autumnal shades from my stash. My neighbour’s selection was beautifully bright and, after she gave me the orange piece to brighten things up a bit, I boldy cut some shapes from an Australian fabric that I had brought along. This was my first fussy cut experience. (For any non quilters who may be reading this, fussy cutting is when one carefully cuts around a shape or image so that it can be showcased in a block, or in this case, shape.)

Yolande’s class sample was so beautiful that I did not even try to emulate her clever arrangement of tones and colours. And her stitching is perfect too!

Yolande Bowman’s Elecongated Hexi sampler

She kindly gave us bonus templates for a mini hexi and I am plotting and planning something for that. But first I must finish quilting my ‘brown study’. I have been using the left over threads from my Garden of Deliqhts quilt and am enjoying the slow stitching.

I have been gardening like crazy after some days of welcome rain. (I won’t bore you with the photograph of the potatoes I harvested this morning, even though I am so proud of how beautifully they grew.) As a result I am a bit late with my post this week and nearly skipped it altogether. But I am glad I did turn on my computer, because I found an invitation to an upcoming Fibreworks exhibition for which I have submitted work. Here it is and I am proud to say that the bronze flower in the centre of the bottom row of images is my work.

11 thoughts on “On Hand Piecing

  1. The stitching with variegated thread on the first photo of close-ups is very effective with that fabric. I am always in awe with your intuitive use of color and materials.
    BTW: the fabric in your elongated hexie cushion cover – second from left on the bottom row – is similar if not the same as some fabric I’ve had in my stash for decades! It was a go-to fabric for me in garments during the late 80s and early 90s. I have kept the scraps and used them over the years in scrappy quilts as well!
    😎

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  2. Interesting to see the hexagons in the quilting. I was also most involved in gardening – especially planting in the lovely rain-soaked soil – leaving little time for things like blogging! Unfortunately, the hail storm has literally put a damper on that as we clean up some of the broken vegetation that was knocked to the ground by the hail. Some lovely young saplings will probably have had their shapes changed for ever as a result of hail damage. Hopefully my gardening spirit will recover along with the garden and its plants.

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    1. Wishing you strength with tending your hail damaged garden and may your gardening spirit return soon.
      I write under correction, but the hexagon shape is possibly one of the oldest quilting blocks or patterns. The true hexagon shape is traditionally called Granny’s Flower Garden and lends itself easily to hand piecing, by joining the shapes with top stitching

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      1. Thanks for the good wishes Mariss,
        That is interesting about the hexagon being one of the oldest quilting shapes. It looks to require a high degree of precision to get the blocks to fit together smoothly.

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